Weekly Feature



2018-03-07 / Lifestyles

Williamsville North High School to present 'Seussical'

‘Why fit in when you were born to stand out?’
by HOLLY N. LIPKA Reporter


Shown in character, Jamie Malkowski as Mayzie LaBird, left, and Emily May as The Cat in the Hat will be performing in “Seussical” at Williamsville North High School. Shown in character, Jamie Malkowski as Mayzie LaBird, left, and Emily May as The Cat in the Hat will be performing in “Seussical” at Williamsville North High School. Williamsville North High School will remind the community of a world where “a person’s a person, no matter how small.”

Williamsville North students will perform “Seussical,” a musical based on the works of Dr. Seuss, on Thursday, March 8; Friday, March 9; and Saturday, March 10.

“Seussical” weaves together beloved stories and characters created by Dr. Seuss, including The Cat in the Hat, Horton the Elephant, Gertrude McFuzz and Mayzie LaBird.

In “Seussical,” The Cat in the Hat narrates the story of Horton, an elephant who one day hears voices coming from a speck of dust. The speck of dust contains the smallest planet in the universe where a tiny race of creatures, known as Whos, live.


Williamsville North students Elise Kulka as Gertrude McFuzz and Tyler Okun as Horton the Elephant will be performing in the school’s musical, “Seussical,” this weekend. 
Photos by Jim SmerecakPurchase color photos at www.BeeNews.com Williamsville North students Elise Kulka as Gertrude McFuzz and Tyler Okun as Horton the Elephant will be performing in the school’s musical, “Seussical,” this weekend. Photos by Jim SmerecakPurchase color photos at www.BeeNews.com Horton decides to protect the speck of dust and tries to convince the other animals in the Jungle of Nool that the Whos are real, but he is ridiculed for believing in something he can’t see. Only his loyal neighbor, Gertrude McFuzz, believes him. Horton and Gertrude band together to save the Whos and restore peace and unity to the Jungle of Nool.

Ultimately, the musical shows the power of imagination, the value and the dignity of others, and that everyone should strive for peace within their nations and their hearts.

“There are so many people in the audience who can benefit from escaping into the world of Dr. Seuss,” said Tyler Okun, a senior who will play Horton. “With everything that’s going on today, we should be escaping to this world where we can learn something and hear that underlying message of treating everyone nicely.” Horton, who is physically and socially different than the other animals, is an easy scapegoat. However, his bulky exterior is matched by his kindness and integrity.

“Horton is the unlikely hero of the story,” said Okun. “He’s thrust into a situation where he has to protect these Whos even when most people around him don’t believe they’re real. He ignores them and steps up to the plate to protect [the Whos]. He’s just misunderstood, and it’s cool to play a character like that because I feel like that’s something we all can relate to.”

Junior Emily May will be playing The Cat in the Hat, who playfully provokes change in the lives of those around him.

“He likes to cause mischief,” said May. “I like the Cat because it’s a lot of fun, and I get to play with the role a little bit.”

Gertrude McFuzz, a bird with great spirit but little grace, will be played by senior Elise Kulka.

“She’s kind of a dork and very awkward, but she just wants to be noticed,” said Kulka. “It’s nice that I can portray this character and show others that it’s OK to be a little dorky.”

Mayzie LaBird, who will be played by senior Jamie Malkowski, flaunts her beauty and enjoys nothing more than being in the spotlight.

“She’s very sassy and flamboyant. I can just go all out, and I don’t have to hold anything back,” said Malkowski.

Along with The Cat in the Hat, Horton, Gertrude and Mayzie, the musical incorporates characters and elements from 15 books by Dr. Seuss.

According to Peter Bernstein’s novel, “Unforgettable Dr. Seuss,” his books are some of the most popular children’s books of all time, selling more than 600 million copies and being translated into more than 20 languages by the time of his death in 1991.

Kristy Cavanagh, musical director, believes his works are so popular because he teaches lessons that can be applied to anyone’s life.

“In his eyes, everyone is important,” said Cavanagh. “In the world we live in right now, it’s important to hear that.”

Performances will be held at 7 p.m. Thursday, Friday and Saturday. There will also be a 2 p.m. matinee on Saturday. Tickets cost $10 and can be purchased at the box office at the school, 1595 Hopkins Road.

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