Weekly Feature



2015-11-11 / Local News

Inventor’s wind turbine called ‘engineering breakthrough’

by KEATON T. DEPRIEST Associate Editor


Kean Stimm, a scientist and engineer, stands in front of a prototype of his “Newtonian wind turbine.” Stimm said the device will provide lower-cost electricity to power, heat and cool buildings. Kean Stimm, a scientist and engineer, stands in front of a prototype of his “Newtonian wind turbine.” Stimm said the device will provide lower-cost electricity to power, heat and cool buildings. About five years ago, a Williamsville man began working to find a way to decrease the world’s dependency on fossil fuels.

Kean Stimm, an inventor, scientist and engineer, developed the Newtonian Wind Turbine, a device that will provide lower-cost electricity to power, heat and cool buildings.

“This is a huge engineering breakthrough,” Stimm said.

He said the development of the turbine was based upon Sir Isaac Newton’s principles regarding centripetal force as it relates to motion and velocity.

Stimm said that as fossil fuels become more and more depleted, the price of natural gas will “skyrocket” in cost.

“We have the answer for that,” Stimm said. “With this invention, wind becomes the number one alternate energy,” he said.

Stimm, owner of Kean Wind Turbines Inc., at 415 Lawrence Bell Drive, Suite 8, Amherst, said the Newtonian Wind Turbine is designed to convert more than 40 percent of wind energy into useful electrical power.

“The reason we are doing this is to provide low-cost, affordable electricity as we are running out of fossil fuels to support the world,” he said.

He said three-blade turbines that are commonly used in the world convert only about 1 percent of usable energy of the wind into electricity.

“The reason for that is if you look at the three-blade windmills, about 95 percent of the wind goes right between the blades and it’s not used,” Stimm said. “With ours, 100 percent of the wind energy goes through the turbine, it’s used and we extract about 50 percent of that energy.”

A longtime sailing enthusiast, Stimm said his turbine’s blades overlap, similar to sails on a boat. Each blade has a fixed pitch.

“Also, our turbine is essentially silent,” Stimm said. “If you put it outside a bedroom window, you won’t hear it.”

Other details of Kean’s wind turbine include:

• The price of one Kean wind turbine is 1/20th that of an existing windmill of equivalent output. The Newtonian Wind Turbines have eight basic components, with a total of only about 80 parts. According to Stimm, a typical three-blade windmill has 8,000 parts.

• Based on a Calspan wind tunnel test of the scale model, it is estimated that the Kean wind turbine will produce power for less than 1 cent per kilowatt-hour — its operating cost — making it the lowest-cost electrical energy source.

• The turbine is being designed and manufactured in two sizes: a 4-meter turbine for commercial and manufacturing rooftops, and a larger 8-meter turbine for industrial, commercial and large operating plants. Each turbine is mounted on a short stand, with ladders inside the stand to provide access for maintenance.

Stimm added that the company is structured so that it remains in Western New York, helping to boost the regional economy. While a U.S. patent for the Newtonian turbine was issued in the spring, the company has also been issued patents in Canada, New Zealand, Australia, Russia and South Africa.

Stimm estimates that through licensing the manufacturing of the turbines to companies throughout the world, Kean Wind Turbines would bring to the region annual royalties totaling millions of dollars.

Each license allows for a manufacturer to produce eight turbines per day.

“We expect to have about 500 manufacturing licenses across the world within about eight years,” Stimm said. “Our primary goal is to license our manufacturing within our given parameters to those companies.”

He said the corporation is funded solely by its shareholders, adding that the company has no debt and all shareholders must be from Western New York.

“This is a community project,” Stimm said. “All the royalties will come back to Western New York and stay here, making our area one of the wealthiest and most prosperous regions in the world,” Stimm said.

Stimm said production of the turbines is expected to begin early next year.

For more details about Kean Wind Turbines, including shareholding and manufacturing licenses, visit the company’s website at www.keanwindturbines.com.

Return to top