2009-11-11 / Front Page

Republicans sweep town races

Weinstein elected supervisor
by JESSICA L. FINCH Associate Editor

Supervisor-elect Dr. Barry Weinstein celebrates with his wife, Lois, at Amherst Republican headquarters on election night, Nov. 3. Photo by Jim Smerecak Purchase color photos at www.BeeNews.com Supervisor-elect Dr. Barry Weinstein celebrates with his wife, Lois, at Amherst Republican headquarters on election night, Nov. 3. Photo by Jim Smerecak Purchase color photos at www.BeeNews.com School board member, legislator, town councilman and now supervisor — Dr. Barry Weinstein won Tuesday’s race with 56 percent of the votes.

Running only on the Republican line, Weinstein received 13,271 votes.

He entered Republican headquarters with his wife, Lois, about an hour after the polls closed and the majority of the districts were reporting his victory.

With a large smile on his face, Weinstein thanked the Amherst Republican Party Committee for its support, after giving a big thank you to his wife.

His main opponent, Democratic candidate Alice Kryzan, received 40 percent of the votes, followed by Conservative candidate Bill Kindel with 5 percent.

“The whole campaign was about myself,” Weinstein said, noting that he promoted himself while Kryzan criticized him.

Candidate Alice Kryzan and volunteer Megan Weibeck watch as election results are posted online. Kryzan later learned she was unsuccessful in her run for town supervisor. Photo by Scott Schild Purchase color photos at www.BeeNews.com Candidate Alice Kryzan and volunteer Megan Weibeck watch as election results are posted online. Kryzan later learned she was unsuccessful in her run for town supervisor. Photo by Scott Schild Purchase color photos at www.BeeNews.com He addressed the issue of his medical practice interfering with his role of supervisor by saying that he doesn’t know how many times he has to say it: he will work full time as supervisor.

Among his top goals are controlling taxes and spending and giving residents the right to vote on downsizing the board.

When Weinstein takes the oath of office in January, his Town Board seat, which has two years remaining, will become vacant.

The morning after the election, Kryzan said she wishes the incoming administration well.

“I want to thank all of my supporters for their encouragement and help during the campaign,” she said.

It was a big night for Amherst Republicans, who gathered at their headquarters at Maple and North Forest roads.

“Congratulations to my running mates; it looks like a clean sweep,” Weinstein said.

Democratic Council Member Dan Ward, the only incumbent in the race, lost to the GOP candidates. It is a change Weinstein is happy about.

“The best way to stop the bickering is to get those guys off Town Board,” he said, adding that the Republicans ran together and he hopes they can serve together.

Just before 10:30 p.m., Republican Chairman Marshall Wood said it was too close to officially call the Town Board race, but members of the party were celebrating and candidates were looking forward to taking their seats in January.

All three were first-time candidates. Barbara Nuchereno, who ran on the Republican, Conservative and Independence lines, said she is excited and slightly intimidated to serve on the board.

“My life is about service, and we will serve the people,” she said, adding that the elected candidates are professionals whom she believes will work well together.

Anderson, who ran only on the Republican line, said he heard “loud and clear” from residents about what they want, and that is change.

Sanders, who highlighted his skills as a certified public accountant during the campaign, said he looked forward to the town having a new board in January.

Nuchereno was the top vote-getter with 21 percent, followed by her two running mates, Anderson and Sanders, who each received 18 percent.

Democratic candidates Romana Popowich (16 percent), Ward (14 percent) and Toni Vazquez (13 percent) fell short.

Nuchereno said she hopes with the new board in place, Amherst will no longer be the laughing stock of the county.

Ward, who has served on the board since 1998, said he believes his loss, in part, was because of a nationwide trend that saw Republicans do well in this election.

He added he will stay involved, making sure the elected members are held to their campaign promises. When asked if he would be in the audience at meetings, he joked that he is addicted and what else would he do on a Monday night.

“Specific issues don’t go away,” he said about continuing to stay involved with his battles.

He thanked those involved in his campaign and said the public just saw a need for change.

The third town race was for judge, and incumbent Mark Farrell ran unopposed, garnering 21,367 votes. January 2010 will mark the beginning of his fifth term.

Both propositions failed. The first would have required unanimously vote to change a deed restriction on a sold property; and the second would have changed seat filling laws to allow only the vacating official’s political party to fill his or her seat.

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